Inspiration

We had three primary inspirations for our project:

  • Augmented Reality: We are fascinated by AR and believe that its power to connect, educate, and engage people all across the world. And so, we were excited to get our shoes wet with developing an AR game.
  • The Game of Go: An ancient — yet unsolved — game with simple rules, complex strategy, and infinite possibilities. We are excited to share our love for go with others.
  • Queen's Gambit: Wouldn't it be so cool to play a board game on the ceiling?

What it does

Combining these motivations, we are thrilled to re-introduce one of the oldest board games in newest AR technology!

More specifically, we have used augmented reality to allow people to play Go within the real world, anytime and anywhere they want.

How we built it

We used Unity, the real-time development platform, to create our AR game, while scripts were created in C#.

Challenges we ran into

  • AR is hard: None of us had prior experience working with Unity or C#, let alone augmented reality. The learning curve was challenging and frustrating at times.
  • Laptop Malfunctions: We encountered technical difficulties — usually laptop crashes — with running our AR project in Unity due to the large storage of the project.

What we learned and accomplished

Three weeks ago, we knew nothing about Augmented Reality except that Pokemon Go has taken over the world by storm. Over the course of the sprint, we really got more comfortable with C# and Unity by simply reading tutorials, watching videos, trying and failing, and being resilient. We are proud to have not given up, and in the process, gained so much confidence and knowledge in a field that we had no prior experience in.

What we learned

Three weeks ago, we knew nothing about Augmented Reality except that Pokemon Go has taken over the world by storm. Over the course of the sprint, we really got more comfortable with C# and Unity

What's next for ArGo

There are lots of potential next steps:

  • Checking for valid moves and tracking captured pieces: Our game currently only allows players to place pieces, and we have not finished the functionality to check for surrounded/captured pieces.
  • Handling end of game territory calculation: A game of go ends when both players decide to 'pass', and territory is counted and our game currently does not handle that end of game calculation.
  • Expanding to multiplayer and AI: Motivated by Deep Mind's AlphaGo, we would love to develop a simple AI functionality as well.

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